NYTIP – enhancing the nyc subway: putting it all together

UPDATE (09.26.2021): Post substantially revised to reflect updates made to the preceding posts in this series. This update summarizes the latest version of the enhanced NYC subway.

Welcome back to my ongoing NYTIP series! When I introduced NYTIP, I outlined a three-point plan for fixing the NYC Subway system: enhance, extend, and expand. This post summarizes the last five posts, which addressed the first point – enhance.

[Let’s recap!]

NYTIP – enhancing the nyc subway: south bronx

UPDATE (09.13.2021): New image added. In a previous update, I substantially revised this post for clarity.

Welcome back to my ongoing NYTIP series! In my last post, I discussed the Eastern Parkway trunk line in Brooklyn served by the 2, 3, 4, and 5 lines. In this post, I will discuss the 2, 3, 4, and 5 lines in Upper Manhattan and The Bronx, and explain why de-interlining is extremely challenging.

[Go on…]

NYTIP – enhancing the nyc subway: broadway and queens boulevard

UPDATE (09.18.2021): Several images updated. In an earlier update, I revised this post for clarity.

In my last post, I discussed the South Brooklyn de-interlining. So far, the de-interlining plans contemplated by NYTIP only involve operational changes. In this post, we’ll explore the Broadway (N, Q, R, and W) and Queens Boulevard (E, F, M, and R) trunk lines. While de-interlining the former is trivial, the latter is much more challenging.

[Let’s dive in!]

NYTIP – enhancing the nyc subway: central park west

UPDATE (08.26.2021): Post revised for clarity.

In my last post, I introduced the New York Transportation Improvement Plan (NYTIP). In that post, I outlined a three-point plan for fixing the NYC Subway:

  • Enhance (minimize merging conflicts)
  • Extend (extend existing lines)
  • Expand (build new lines)

I’ll begin my series on point 1 – enhance – with the Central Park West (CPW) trunk line, which serves the A, B, C, and D trains.

[Let’s begin!]

nerdy.nel’s new york transportation improvement plan (NYTIP)

UPDATE (12.04.2021): SAS Phase 2X/LGA post updated. More post updates forthcoming. No new posts yet.

Introduction || I. NYC Subway (*) || II. Regional Rail || III. Rethinking Roads || IV. Better Buses || V. Bicycles || VI. Micromobility || VII. Ferries and Freight || VIII. Cost Volume || Miscellany

(!) – section contains new posts
(*) – section contains updated posts

INTRODUCTION

Over the years, I’ve given much thought to transportation infrastructure in the New York metropolitan area and how to improve it. At first, I mainly focused on subways, given my love of trains. Recently, however, I began thinking beyond the rails. It’s no secret – NYC’s subway is in crisis. NY is always stuck in traffic. NY’s highways are a chief source of pollution and misery. Politicians blame bikes for car-caused congestion.

The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) presented a golden opportunity to rethink transportation in and around NY. Stay-at-home orders and the resulting decrease in traffic reduced air pollution in cities worldwide; along the Eastern Seaboard, cities normally inundated with pollution from Interstate 95 enjoyed an unusual respite. However, despite the usual rhetoric, politicians have largely failed to seize the moment – traffic hell is slowly returning, with no meaningful solutions in sight.

So how do we fix all this? How do we get NY moving again post-pandemic, in a way that also achieves environmental justice for all?

Enter the New York Transportation Improvement Plan (NYTIP)!

[learn more about NYTIP!]