NYTIP INSIDER – jump-starting the subway amidst the rona

The novel coronavirus, a.k.a. COVID-19, wreaked havoc on mass transit systems nationwide. In NYC, lockdowns, telework, changes in commuting behavior, and increased wariness about transit use led to massive ridership drops on subways, buses, and commuter rail. Worse, vehicular traffic has already returned to pre-pandemic levels – and it’ll likely worsen.

With no sign of relief in sight, the MTA warned of doomsday cuts at a level not seen in decades. Given these dire circumstances, where does that leave NYTIP?

Find out on this edition of the NYTIP INSIDER.

[Onward!]

NYTIP – extending the nyc subway, part 5a: queens boulevard de-interlining (phase 2), and utica avenue revisited

UPDATE (01.18.2021): Updated with a revised recommendation for the Utica Avenue subway.

Welcome back to my NYTIP series! When I revised my first post on the Queens Boulevard de-interlining, I referred to it as “Phase 1”. This is because full de-interlining requires major capital investment – it’s not possible with existing rolling stock or infrastructure. I alluded to some of those investments in that post – namely, a new “K” line, and the Worth Street subway. As I delved into these options to determine whether they were worth pursuing, I noticed that they dovetailed nicely with other improvements. How, you ask?

[Read on to find out!]

NYTIP INSIDER – on the delicate balance between de-interlining and destabilization

If you’ve read my blog for any length of time, you’ve noticed I’m hard at work on a personal project called the New York Transportation Improvement Plan, or NYTIP. With regard to subways, NYTIP prescribes a three-point plan – enhance, extend, and expand. NYTIP is about the long game, but in order to win that game, one must lay the proper foundation.

[let’s set the foundation!]

NYTIP – enhancing the nyc subway, part 6: putting it all together

UPDATE (12.07.2020): Post updated with several revisions to the enhanced NYC Subway plan.

Welcome back to my ongoing series on the New York Transportation Improvement Plan (NYTIP)! When I introduced NYTIP, I outlined a three-point plan for fixing the NYC Subway system: enhance, extend, and expand. This post summarizes the last five posts, which addressed the first point – enhance.

[Let’s recap!]

NYTIP – enhancing the nyc subway, part 2: south brooklyn

UPDATE (10.28.2020): Post updated with modified recommendations for South Brooklyn de-interlining.

In my last post, I discussed the Central Park West de-interlining. Continuing with point 1 of my three-point plan to improve the NYC Subway (enhance), I’ll address the B, D, N, Q, and R lines in Brooklyn.

[Let’s do this!]

NYTIP – enhancing the nyc subway, part 1: central park west

UPDATE (12.06.2020): Post substantially revised to clarify available options for the CPW de-interlining. Some images updated. New images added.

In my last post, I introduced the New York Transportation Improvement Plan (NYTIP). In that post, I outlined a three-point plan for fixing the NYC Subway:

  1. Enhance (minimize merging conflicts)
  2. Extend (extend existing lines)
  3. Expand (build new lines)

Regarding point 1 (enhance), I’ll begin with the Central Park West (CPW) trunk line, which serves the A, B, C, and D trains.

[Let’s begin!]