NYTIP – enhancing the nyc subway, part 3.5: astoria and south brooklyn

Welcome back to my ongoing NYTIP series! In the comments section of my post on SAS Phase 2X, commenter mrsman gave some interesting commentary about alternate de-interlining strategies (also see this Reddit thread). It got me thinking about how to handle the Astoria/Broadway and South Brooklyn de-interlining in the absence of a new yard north of Astoria – Ditmars Blvd station. Let’s explore, shall we?

[yes, lets!]

NYTIP – enhancing the nyc subway, part 6: putting it all together

UPDATE (11.03.2019): Post revised for clarity. Some images updated.

Welcome back to my ongoing series on the New York Transportation Improvement Plan (NYTIP)! When I introduced NYTIP, I outlined a three-point plan for fixing the NYC Subway system: enhance, extend, and expand. This post summarizes the last five posts, which addressed the first point – enhance.

[Let’s recap!]

NYTIP – enhancing the nyc subway, part 5: south bronx

UPDATE (11.03.2019): Post updated for clarity. Some images updated. New images added.

Welcome back to my ongoing series on the New York Transportation Improvement Plan (NYTIP)! In my last post, I discussed the Eastern Parkway trunk line served by the 2, 3, 4, and 5 lines in Brooklyn. In this post, I will discuss the 2, 3, 4, and 5 lines in Manhattan and The Bronx, and explain why de-interlining is extremely challenging.

[Go on…]

NYTIP – enhancing the nyc subway, part 4: eastern parkway

Welcome back to my ongoing series on the New York Transportation Improvement Plan (NYTIP)! In my last post, I discussed ways to improve the Broadway and Queens Boulevard lines. In this post, I will discuss the Eastern Parkway trunk line served by the 2, 3, 4, and 5 lines in Brooklyn.

[let’s travel!]

NYTIP – enhancing the nyc subway, part 3: broadway and queens boulevard

UPDATE (01.13.2020): Post updated with additional commentary.

In my last post, I discussed the South Brooklyn de-interlining. So far, the de-interlining plans contemplated by NYTIP involve simple swaps. In this part, we’ll explore the Broadway (N, Q, R, and W) and Queens Boulevard (E, F, M, and R) lines; while streamlining the former is trivial, the latter is much more challenging.

[Let’s dive in!]

NYTIP – enhancing the nyc subway, part 1: central park west

UPDATE (10.29.2019): Post revised for clarity. Some images updated. New images added.

In my last post, I introduced the New York Transportation Improvement Plan (NYTIP). In that post, I outlined a three-point plan for fixing the NYC Subway:

  1. Enhance (minimize merging conflicts)
  2. Extend (extend existing lines)
  3. Expand (build new lines)

Regarding point 1 (enhance), I’ll begin with the Central Park West (CPW) trunk line, which serves the A, B, C, and D trains.

[Let’s begin!]

nerdy.nel’s new york transportation improvement plan (NYTIP): an introduction

UPDATE (03.22.2020): Updated the Concourse/Pelham line extension post. Check back often for updates!

Over the years, I’ve given much thought to New York’s transportation infrastructure and how to improve it. While I mainly focused on subways, given my love of trains, I recently began thinking beyond the rails.

It’s no secret – NYC’s subway is in crisis. NY is always stuck in traffic. NY’s highways are a chief source of pollution and misery. Politicians blame bikes for car-caused congestion. And none of it’s getting any better. So how do we fix it?

Introducing the New York Transportation Improvement Plan (NYTIP)!

[learn more about NYTIP]