NYTIP – transforming commuter rail, part 1a: the harlem line in nyc

UPDATE (07.06.2021): Post updated to correct errors in the Shell Junction diagrams; this update also includes additional commentary on said junction.

Welcome back to my NYTIP series! In this series of posts, which comprise Volume II of NYTIP – transforming commuter rail into regional rail, I will discuss ideas for transforming the disjoint commuter rail systems in the Tri-State Area into an integrated regional rail network. This post addresses the Harlem line – a branch of MTA’s Metro-North Railroad – in The Bronx.

[Let the transformation begin!]

nerdy.nel’s new york transportation improvement plan (NYTIP)

UPDATE (09.19.2021): I’m updating several posts over the next few weeks for clarity. Some of these changes will affect the enhanced NYC Subway plan, so I will update the Excel file soon. No new posts yet.

Introduction || I. NYC Subway (*) || II. Regional Rail || III. Rethinking Roads || IV. Better Buses || V. Bicycles || VI. Micromobility || VII. Ferries and Freight || VIII. Cost Volume || Miscellany

(!) – section contains new posts
(*) – section contains updated posts

INTRODUCTION

Over the years, I’ve given much thought to transportation infrastructure in the New York metropolitan area and how to improve it. At first, I mainly focused on subways, given my love of trains. Recently, however, I began thinking beyond the rails. It’s no secret – NYC’s subway is in crisis. NY is always stuck in traffic. NY’s highways are a chief source of pollution and misery. Politicians blame bikes for car-caused congestion.

The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) presented a golden opportunity to rethink transportation in and around NY. Stay-at-home orders and the resulting decrease in traffic reduced air pollution in cities worldwide; along the Eastern Seaboard, cities normally inundated with pollution from Interstate 95 enjoyed an unusual respite. However, despite the usual rhetoric, politicians have largely failed to seize the moment – traffic hell is slowly returning, with no meaningful solutions in sight.

So how do we fix all this? How do we get NY moving again post-pandemic, in a way that also achieves environmental justice for all?

Enter the New York Transportation Improvement Plan (NYTIP)!

[learn more about NYTIP!]